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WHITEWASHED BUILDINGS

white-washed, thatched cottage

Whitewash was made from burnt lime (from limekilns), which, when mixed with water, gave off a lot of heat. This heat assisted with the emulsification of animal fat mixed with it which made the whitewash waterproof.

GEORGE LIPSCOMBE'S TOUR OF SOUTH WALES, 1799

Another village [Llanon ?] soon offered itself to our notice, whose church standing near enough to the sea-side for a land mark, has its tower more appropriately white-washed.

George Lipscomb, G., Journey into South Wales..in the year 1799 (London, 1802), p. 166

[Cardigan] I never yet saw a confined landscape possessed of more striking beauties, or better adapted for the pencil. It is, however, much to be wished, that the custom so prevalant in this part of the country, of white-washing the roofs as well as the side walls of the houses, were abolished: it offends the eye by a glare highly unpleasant; destroys the harmony of the picture, and, if I may be allowed the expression, impoverishes the prospect.

George Lipscomb, G., Journey into South Wales..in the year 1799 (London, 1802), p. 173

The houses, however, being built of a kind of black slate, have a gloomy appearance, and though white washing in Wales is almost universal, by some strange perversity, here it is omitted where it really would conduce to the cheerful aspect of the place.

W Mavor, The British Tourists' or Travellers' pocket Companion, London, 1809, p. 237

COTTAGES IN CEREDIGION

LIME