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CHEESE MAKING

exhibition number: Dairy 15

Normally, whole milk was used to make cheese but it is possible to make a rather poor cheese with skimmed milk. The milk was heated to blood temperature in a large brass pan. Rennet (which comes from calves stomachs) was added and then allowed to cool forming a jelly like substance. This was cut with a knife or curd cutter or cheese mill to help separate the curds from the whey. This mixture was filtered through cheese cloth in a perforated crock. The curds were mixed with salt and colouring sometimes, placed in a wooden vat and pressed in a cheese press to squeeze out all the remaining whey. The whey was fed to pigs. The wooden cheese press would have been locally. Stones were placed in the box to slowly increase pressure on the cheese. The cast iron cheese press was made elsewhere and delivered by train. The gear-wheels multiply the small weight hanging on the lever so that there is great pressure on the cheese. The radial runners on the bottom of the iron press allow the whey to run into a container below.

Cheese was normally made from skimmed milk after the calves had weaned. (January onwards) and it could be made with a mixture of cows and sheep's milk.

Moore-Colyer, R.J., (1998), Agriculture and Occupation in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Cardiganshire, Ceredigion County History, III, pp. 46

A-Z DAIRY

CHEESE CUTTER

CHEESE SAMPLER

CHEESE VAT

CHEESE PRESS

CHEESE PAN

CURD KNIFE

CURD DRAINER

CURD MILL

CHEESE CLOTH

DAIRY