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PIGS

exhibition number: Agriculture 22

Almost everyone kept a pig or two. They were a major source of food and were good at converting food that people cannot eat into food they can eat. Almost every part of a pig can be eaten - it is said that all of a pig can be eaten except the squeak (the noise it makes when it is killed). For those that could feed more than one or two pigs they were also a source of additional pocket money since they could be sold.

A pig was slaughtered during of the potato harvest (October onwards) so the remaining pigs could be fed on the new potatoes. The killing of a pig was celebrated with a feast since some of the pig could not be preserved and had to be eaten quickly: some of this was shared with neighbours. If the pig meat was sold rather than preserved for eating by the family, some of the money may be spent on new clothes and beer. People who wore new clothes or were drunk were said to have just 'killed a pig'.

Jenkins, David, (1971), The Agricultural Community in South-West Wales, p. 59

There was a local breed of pig with long-bodies and flop-eared - but these were bred with English breeds and had virtually died out by the middle of the 19th century.

Moore-Colyer, R.J., (1998), Agriculture and Occupation in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Cardiganshire, Ceredigion County History, III, pp. 47

PIG TROUGH

PIG SCRAPER

PIG RING

PIG RING PINCER

PIG RING INSERTER

BACON FACTORY

GAMBREL

AGRICULTURE INDEX

 

 

Pig Trough
pig scraper 2
Pig Scraper
pig ring
Pig ring pliers
Pig ring inserter
Gambrel
salting dish