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SHEEP

Blaenpennal, sheep shearing

exhibition number: Agriculture 21

Sheep farming became one of the most important activities of north Ceredigion, but it left very little in the way of artifacts. They provided wool and some milk and meat.

Sheep by Seren Bell

Sheep were left to feed off mountains of Ceredigion (known as the green desert or the great mountain - y mynydd mawr) during the summer, and gathered in only for shearing, washing and in the autumn to be taken to English markets by drovers, while a few were retained for breeding and folding (bringing into the home farm) when some were fed with turnips.

Sheep by Seren Bell

Sheep farmers were referred to as mountain people (pobl y mynydd) who worked the mountain farms and in this way were distinguished from the country people, but many sheep farmers had a close link with a country farm which supplied oats and labour when necessary, while the sheep farmers could help with the harvest after shearing. The sheep farm unit was known a ridge (esgeirydd) - the land between the streams that flowed into the Teifi.

Most of the sheep now bred in Ceredigion are Pedigree Aberystwyth or Improved Welsh Mountain Sheep, derived from a variety of Welsh Mountain sheep.

Moore-Colyer, R.J., (1998), Agriculture and Occupation in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Cardiganshire, Ceredigion County History, III, pp. 49-50

Jenkins, David, (1998), 'Land and Community around the close of the nineteenth century' in Cardiganshire County History, III, 106

Williams-Davies, John, (1981), Welsh Sheep and Their Wool.

WELSH MOUNTAIN SHEEP

TALLY STICK

SHEPHERD'S CROOK

SHEEP CASTRATING CLAMP

SHEEP DIPPING

SHEEP SHEARING

TAIL DOCKER

SHEEP MARKING

CARDING, SPINNING AND WEAVING WOOL

FARM ANIMALS IN WALES

AGRICULTURE INDEX