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HAY

raking hay, Llanon, about 1900

exhibition number: Agriculture 10

GROWING AND CUTTING HAY

There were two sorts of hay grown in south Ceredigion at the end of the 19th century. That which was grown from seed (gwair hade) and that which grew on permanent pasture (gwair gwndwn). The former was fed to horses while the latter was fed to cattle. Hay was harvested around July.

Cribyn, raking hay pre 1914

Jenkins, David, (1971), The Agricultural Community in South-West Wales

TYPES OF HAY

hay harvest, Tregroes, about 1900

Other sorts of hay were harvested on larger farms: hay on slopes that could not be used for other purposes and hay from the moors (gwair rhos) or short moorland hay (gwair rhos gota) which was harvested when still unripe.

Jenkins, David, (1998), 'Land and Community around the close of the nineteenth century' in Cardiganshire County History, III, 104

SOWING GRASS SEED

hay harvest, Penparc, 1920s

The land is prepared carefully with the plough and harrow. The seed is scattered by hand or with the seed-barrow which drops seed evenly over a strip of land 12 feet in width.

STORING HAY

pitching hay, Lampeter, 1920s

Hay was normally stored in stacks once it was dry. During the 20th century other methods of storing hay were invented. These included silage (which involved storing the hay in silos and other air- and water-tight containers and mixing it with chemicals such as molasses and acids and bacteria). Big Bale silage is now a common method of storing grass.

The Welsh Plant Breeding Station at Gogerddan, near Aberystwyth played an important part in the development of high yield grass varieties.

Llanfarian Community Council, (2000), Cof Cymuned, a collection of photographs, p 25

MOWING

HARVESTING HAY

HAY STACKS

AGRICULTURE INDEX